All posts tagged: Green Village Bali

Autodesk scan of a bamboo house by IBUKU

Autodesk’s Making the Future team came to Green Village

This is not an old Balinese painting, in fact it’s the latest in bamboo architecture, scanned by the incredible Autodesk team who came here to do the impossible- capture an artisan hand built house by IBUKU and turn it into a billion data points and dots using drones. Because Green Village’s homes are built from bamboo, they don’t have traditional walls, traditional squared corners, or uniform surfaces. The bamboo used to build the structures—which can be up to six stories high—is almost always curved (because bamboo often grows curved, and because the homes in Green Village are purposefully built with curves to best conform to their surroundings). The floors are made of sliced bamboo, creating deeply ridged textures. The interior walls are also made of bamboo, and from the outside, you can literally see clear through huge portions of each home to the forest on the other side. This makes the LiDAR capturing of Green Village’s structures very complex. Some of the light beams will hit curved outer bamboo walls and beams. Others will hit wildly textured furniture …

Green Village by New Atlas

READ: Exploring Bali’s enchanting bamboo village with New Atlas

Great new article and photo essay from New Atlas on the houses of Green Village. Much of the village’s furniture and interior decorations are bespoke and crafted to emphasize the versatility and aesthetic appeal of bamboo. An intricate lampshade made up of 30 or 40 separate shoots hovering over the study on the Garden Villa’s top floor was the probably the most sophisticated example of this, but we were also impressed by thick bamboo columns fashioned into bar stools and parked alongside the kitchen’s island bench.  

Elora Hardy by Heather Bonker at TEDxUbud

TEDxUbud: Elora Hardy and Houses made of grass

In 2014, Elora spoke at TEDxUbud. “Thousands of handmade pegs, 18 meter long poles, bare feet, and hundreds of hands. This is what it takes to make a house designed by Elora Hardy. She’s interested in changing the perception of luxury in relation to scarcity and abundance. Her tool? The super grass that is bamboo.” Raised in Ubud, Elora spent 14 years of her young adult life in the United States, where she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Tufts University and went on to become sole textile and print designer for Donna Karan Intl. In 2010, Elora returned to Bali to carry on the incredible work of the design-build team that created the world-renowned Green School in Bali, founded by her father John Hardy. She reconnected with the culture and landscape that she loves and today continues to cultivate Balinese artisans alongside innovative designers and architects with the goal of making Bali a global center for sustainable design and bringing those designs to the rest of the world.

The Bamboo Architecture of Green Village

Geobeats video on the Green Village. Green Village in Bali, Indonesia is an architectural gem – a dream like setting.  Built by the design team, Ibuku, a company that strives to create residences where people can maintain an ‘authentic relationship with nature’. Green Village is constructed completely of bamboo, including the stairs, cabinets, walls and furniture. The designer’s website states “new treatment methods have given bamboo a capacity for long life. We harvest and treat all of our own bamboo, selecting for density and maturity, then lab test to confirm its integrity”. The buildings are nothing short of beautiful spectacular. Surrounded by lush, jungle-like greenery, circular doors and floor-to-ceiling windows open to the gorgeous outdoors. The design gives a wide open, one-with-nature feel to the residences. Bamboo stalks appear to serve as intricately placed architectural posts, while the stairs and railings depict hand carved, unique pieces of structural art.

Financial Times: Bali and the Chocolate Factory

While Bali’s south coast is being swallowed up by villa and resort developments, there is an innovative green design movement gathering pace on the island. The area in and around Sibang, an off-the-map hamlet between Ubud and Denpasar, has become an unexpected centre for buildings made almost entirely of bamboo. But unlike the bamboo structures that have popped up for centuries throughout Asia and South and Central America, these buildings are resistant to decay and radically innovative. Click here for further reading.  January 27, 2012, Gisela Williams