All posts tagged: Green School

Green School in Stuff NZ

Where there are no walls, no algebra and no limits

A Green School story by Rachel Thomas in Stuff NZ: When it comes to learning, it’s about lighting a fire, not filling a bucket, Green School Board of Management chairwoman, Kate Druhan says. The idea is to find something a student is passionate about or interested in, then build the literacy and numeracy elements into that through themes or projects. “So for example if you’re doing a thematic around rice we will do some geography there around where rice is grown. We will bring some maths in designing your own rice paddy, flooding it out, buying seedlings, working out the cost, cooking with that rice… Read the whole article at Stuff NZ

Green Shoots by Juliet Kinsman

READ: Green Shoots

Juliet Kinsman writes about the Green Family in the St Regis Magazine. Bali has long attracted free-thinkers: travelers seeking a tropical escape from the usual routine, with a spiritual dimension. When John Hardy arrived in the 1970s, he was struck by the beauty of the island, the lush landscape, the kindness of the people. When I visited the island, it was the unique institution that he and his wife had created there that entranced me: the Green School. This bamboo structure is impressive not just because it’s made from sustainably harvested materials from the surrounding forests, but because of its green ethos and the family behind it. Which is why I am writing this from a balé in the Balinese jungle: I was so inspired by the Green School that I decided to move to the island for three months and enroll my daughter in the school. As she runs around in the sunshine, I can work in the café. The story behind the Green School offers many lessons, not just about what can be achieved by …

Cynthia Hardy

A profile of Cynthia Hardy

A wonderful interview and profile of Cynthia Hardy in MM. Lafleur. Cynthia talks about travels, her life as a mother, and her role as co-founder of Green School and more. ON FOUNDING A HOTEL… AND A SCHOOL: We started building our house in Bali in 1995, and it was finished in 1997. Then, in the early 2000s, a piece of land just south of ours came onto the market. We didn’t need more space, but we knew that if we didn’t buy it someone else was going to build a hotel there. So we bought it and sat on it for a few years. We knew this really industrious guy from Java, and we asked him to find us some furniture and old wooden houses—traditional ones built in primitive ways, from logs, without panels. We put them up on that land and had the Neiman Marcus buyers come out and stay there. Eventually, we decided to turn it into something that paid for itself, and now it’s a little hotel called Bambu Indah that’s essentially an …

Jaggery by Suzi Mifsud

Permaculture solutions for Bali’s coconut problems

A permaculture story by Orin Hardy.  There are lot of coconut trees in Bali and they’re a very important part of Bali’s culture and life. Coconuts are an incredible food source and they are disappearing because people don’t know how to climb trees any more, or how to manage the trees in increasingly populated areas where the coconuts actually become dangerous to people walking around underneath them. At Green School, The Kul Kul Farm has been working to find ways to ensure the long term productivity and ongoing management of the existing trees on the campus. Before the school existed the land was used as a coconut plantation, so now we look for ways to keep the trees productive and the school safe. It’s actually even more productive than it used to be as a coconut plantation because we are increasing the yields and we’re producing added value products like coconut sugar. The high quality sugar we produce is also supporting the development of a small industry in the area. The coconut climbing tool in …

John Hardy at MIT

The top 16 posts of 2016 on Green by John

I never thought Green by John would take off like this. Thank you to all the readers and have a happy 2017. Here are the top 16 most-read posts of 2016 on Green by John. From the bottom up:  NO 16: MEET: The NALU Team They saw something that wasn’t right, so they started a business to sell t-shirts to make it right. The story of the student-run social enterprise that is NALU made it to the 16 most read articles on Green by John for 2016. NO 15: Spearing garbage, talking trash The rule of the trash walk is simple, you have to keep walking, keep spearing and keep talking. NO 14: Back to school with the new Green School classrooms IBUKU designed and built  new classrooms for Green School. Take a look at the end result as the kids start using the spaces. NO 13: IBUKU goes to Hong Kong The end result of IBUKU’s design for TRi Restaurant came it at number 13 on the list. TRi is IBUKU’s first overseas project. NO 12: What if kids …

Bamboo building course Bamboo U 2017

Join us for Bamboo U 2017

The Bamboo U camp held in 2016 was incredible. Take a look at the video below and then join us for the 2017 version.  Bamboo U is a design and bamboo building workshop in Bali hosted by the Kul Kul Farm at the Green School; facilitated in collaboration with the bamboo design firm, IBUKU. Bamboo U is an opportunity to design and build with bamboo alongside some of the architects, designers and craftsmen who built Green School. The group will investigate the available sites and hear from Elora Hardy and her team at IBUKU, the design firm that designed many of the classrooms at Green School and all the houses at Green Village.   

Gunter Pauli

MEET: Gunter Pauli

Gunter Pauli will be the Key Note Speaker at the 2015 Green School Graduation. Initiator of the Blue Ecocomy, he’s been called the Steve Jobs of  Sustainability. If you haven’t seen his TEDxTokyo talk, watch it.

READ: Three Springs by Alan Wagstaff

When I first read it I immediately wanted to visit this school centered community. Unfortunately it only existed in a Visionary’s mind. Now you can come to Green School. Three Springs is a design concept for a living community. Essentially it is a village, containing all the ecological, biological, and sociological elements needed to promote a sustainable, holistic, and quality lifestyle. It is proposed as an inspiring model for the wider community. The nucleus of the village will be a school. The school will provide a genuine heart, where emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence, kinesthetic intelligence, and beauty are prized. It will infuse enthusiasm and purpose into the entire project. The workshops, homes, farms, and businesses; craftspeople, artists, families and individuals will have a direct, practical link to the educational provision.