All posts tagged: Elora Hardy

Cacao House by IBUKU

Is Bamboo the Sustainable Building Material of the Future?

Vogue recently featured IBUKU’s work with an interview with Elora Hardy on her inspiration and design philosophy: “A lot of the problem is the curves, but that’s also the magic and the opportunity. Just as the best clothes wrap around real curves in just the right way, the way a house curves around you can feel just right,” Elora explains. “But it takes a different mind-set to get it right. Bamboo doesn’t follow the rules of the past few centuries of architecture and construction—it’s literally a different shape, being round and hollow and tapering. So as designers, we have to learn, then develop, then write the rules for ourselves, to suit what we see is possible with bamboo.” She likens her design approach to the way an artist works on a canvas. Rather than trying to create a specific vision on a blank page, she prefers to spill the ink and see how it flows.

Ananda House by Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest featuring Ananda House at Green Village

Hot off the press! IBUKU’s latest creation for David Hornblow and family at Green Village is in the May edition of Architectural Digest. “It’s really important to me that we move beyond the bamboo-hut idea,” explains Elora, the creative director, emphasizing Ibuku’s integration of technical innovation with local craftsmanship. The combination has resulted in properties that are surprisingly ambitious in scale—one of these surreal tropical mansions boasts six floors and measures more than 8,000 square feet. “As we continue to push the limits, my role is to be the connector,” says Elora, who grew up in Bali and has never studied architecture. “With the client and Ibuku’s architects, model makers, and craftsmen, there’s an entire dialogue that unfolds when we create these houses.” Read more here.

Bamboo U Workshop Bali February 2017 (4 of 13)

Building with bamboo: Photos from Bamboo U

The February edition of Bamboo U just wrapped up. The Kul Kul Farm team (led by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia) wrote a great review. There’s an excerpt of it below, but make sure to read the rest over on The Kul Kul Farm website.   Bamboo. The mighty plant of the tropics. The King (and Queen) of natural building. It stands tall in sheltered valleys, grows at a fascinating pace, and is gracefully flexible, strong and beautiful. Let’s face it, bamboo is why many people come to Green School. Combine this abundant material with the Balinese craftsmen and a creative design team.. and you have magic. And who doesn’t want magic? So here we are. Bamboo U: February Edition. Our second successful bamboo building course, envisioned by John Hardy, developed by us at the farm, with the support of Elora Hardy and the IBUKU team. Its a tall order delivering magic in 12 days, whilst giving people the skills and tools to create their own magic elsewhere. Especially when the experts; the Balinese craftsmen, don’t speak fluent English. But, when creative, …

John Hardy at MIT

The top 16 posts of 2016 on Green by John

I never thought Green by John would take off like this. Thank you to all the readers and have a happy 2017. Here are the top 16 most-read posts of 2016 on Green by John. From the bottom up:  NO 16: MEET: The NALU Team They saw something that wasn’t right, so they started a business to sell t-shirts to make it right. The story of the student-run social enterprise that is NALU made it to the 16 most read articles on Green by John for 2016. NO 15: Spearing garbage, talking trash The rule of the trash walk is simple, you have to keep walking, keep spearing and keep talking. NO 14: Back to school with the new Green School classrooms IBUKU designed and built  new classrooms for Green School. Take a look at the end result as the kids start using the spaces. NO 13: IBUKU goes to Hong Kong The end result of IBUKU’s design for TRi Restaurant came it at number 13 on the list. TRi is IBUKU’s first overseas project. NO 12: What if kids …

Falling for Balinese bamboo furniture

READ: IBUKU’s furniture collection in the Financial Times

“Fast forward to 2016 and back in Bali’s verdant hinterland, local artisans are carefully bending this ultra-sustainable resource into fantastically undulating sculptures, sans splinters, under the design direction of Hardy’s equally talented daughter Elora. The former designer at Donna Karan returned home to Bali in 2010 to realise what she calls her father’s “big dreams made out of overgrown grass”. This summer, Elora launched the Ibuku furniture collection, an online catalogue of these natural, artful furnishings that already populate the monumental custom bamboo houses of Green Village, this talented family’s other bamboo-building venture.” Read the full article by Cynthia Rosenfeld in the How to Spend It section of the Financial Times.

Elora Hardy at C2 Montreal 2016

4 of my favorite speakers from C2 Montreal 2016

C2 was better than ever. More going on, more food, better organized. Really incredible group of people there. The Hatch group were there and they are so much fun. They really give C2 a real boost. My personal highlight was, of course, my daughter Elora. Because of C2’s history with Cirque Du Soleil, the audiovisual is incredible. When I saw Elora standing in her pictures, it was incredible. Standing in her work or even in a picture with me. Her talk was beautiful. It really emphasized the importance of people connecting with the earth when they build. David Suzuki was so clear and eloquent. He is Canada’s original environmentalist. His show has been running since 1960. I got to meet him personally; he is amazing. The main takeaway from his talk was that the tides, the winds and the rotation of the earth are all things we really can’t change, although we are messing with them. But artificial systems, like the market, can be changed. And Suzuki pushed that point home by standing in a …

Bamboo in the Financial Times

READ: Bamboo is the 21st Century Green Steel

Financial Times recently ran an article on the rise of bamboo architecture in Asia featuring Ibuku and many other pioneers in the field. “Most people, especially in Asia, think that you couldn’t be poor enough or rural enough to actually want to live in a bamboo house,” says Hardy. Yet now that a newly developed boron solution can protect bamboo against termites, it is no longer a symbol of poverty: a three-bedroom house in the Green Village is on sale for $695,000. Ibuku aims to convince people that bamboo is not just a practical material, but something worth aspiring to. Read the whole article by Clarissa Sebag-Montifiore:  Why bamboo is the ‘green steel’ of 21st-century Asian architecture

TED 2016

Back to TED

Cynthia and I will be at TED in Vancouver. When I stood up on the stage at Oxford and spoke, I honestly thought TED was an airplane brand in America. I had no idea 750,000 people would eventually watch that talk and it would power Green School. The next thing I knew I was in the audience with Elora speaking at TED. And she is almost at 2.5 million views. And what’s coming is the TED talk from the Bye Bye Plastic Bags girls. TED is the definitely the four best days of most years for me. Thank you TED, for being there and caring. -JH