All posts filed under: Press

Press mentions of John Hardy, Green School, Ibuku, Bambu Indah, Kul Kul Farm and other Green family members

Green School Bali by Jeremy Piper

Green School featured in The New York Times

Hot off the press! November 13, 2017. Incredible coverage by Tom Vanderbilt for the New York Times ! We are looking to build more green schools and this will help! Read the whole Green School profile here. Words by Tom Vanderbilt and photos by Jeremy Piper. “When I asked Druhan if she could sum up Green School in one moment, she paused. One of her strongest memories was when her young son was doing the “rice thematic”— rice being of central economic and cultural import in Bali. His class had gone out in the fields to learn how to grow rice. He raved about the farmer. “He said, ‘Mum, he’s like a scientist! He has so much knowledge, and he doesn’t have even any instruments.”’ The students went on not only to harvest the rice, but cook an elaborate dinner in an underground fire pit, which they served to the farmers, parents and teachers. “That was everything that’s good about Green School in one moment: The hands-on learning, the respect for school values, the connection …

Green School in Stuff NZ

Where there are no walls, no algebra and no limits

A Green School story by Rachel Thomas in Stuff NZ: When it comes to learning, it’s about lighting a fire, not filling a bucket, Green School Board of Management chairwoman, Kate Druhan says. The idea is to find something a student is passionate about or interested in, then build the literacy and numeracy elements into that through themes or projects. “So for example if you’re doing a thematic around rice we will do some geography there around where rice is grown. We will bring some maths in designing your own rice paddy, flooding it out, buying seedlings, working out the cost, cooking with that rice… Read the whole article at Stuff NZ

Cacao House by IBUKU

Is Bamboo the Sustainable Building Material of the Future?

Vogue recently featured IBUKU’s work with an interview with Elora Hardy on her inspiration and design philosophy: “A lot of the problem is the curves, but that’s also the magic and the opportunity. Just as the best clothes wrap around real curves in just the right way, the way a house curves around you can feel just right,” Elora explains. “But it takes a different mind-set to get it right. Bamboo doesn’t follow the rules of the past few centuries of architecture and construction—it’s literally a different shape, being round and hollow and tapering. So as designers, we have to learn, then develop, then write the rules for ourselves, to suit what we see is possible with bamboo.” She likens her design approach to the way an artist works on a canvas. Rather than trying to create a specific vision on a blank page, she prefers to spill the ink and see how it flows.

Green Shoots by Juliet Kinsman

READ: Green Shoots

Juliet Kinsman writes about the Green Family in the St Regis Magazine. Bali has long attracted free-thinkers: travelers seeking a tropical escape from the usual routine, with a spiritual dimension. When John Hardy arrived in the 1970s, he was struck by the beauty of the island, the lush landscape, the kindness of the people. When I visited the island, it was the unique institution that he and his wife had created there that entranced me: the Green School. This bamboo structure is impressive not just because it’s made from sustainably harvested materials from the surrounding forests, but because of its green ethos and the family behind it. Which is why I am writing this from a balé in the Balinese jungle: I was so inspired by the Green School that I decided to move to the island for three months and enroll my daughter in the school. As she runs around in the sunshine, I can work in the café. The story behind the Green School offers many lessons, not just about what can be achieved by …

Sharma Springs entrance

READ: Elora Hardy’s treehouses from dreams

Green Village and IBUKU were recently featured on New Zealand’s Stuff website. Green Village panders to nature, not the other way around. Bamboo is more flexible, more durable and lighter than most timbers, and has greater ultimate strength than steel. It’s also termite resistant and, when treated with boron, makes it inedible for insects. Bamboo homes have been known to withstand 9.0 magnitude earthquakes. Take note, Wellington. Hardy’s father, jeweller John Hardy, founded the nearby Green School, another bamboo wonderland for children, dedicated to teaching sustainable living and holistic approaches to life. Both were created as places where people can live and learn in an authentic relationship with nature. Read the whole article by Rachel Thomas here.

Hardy Architectural Digest Photos by Tim Street Porter

Architectural Digest: The Hardy home in New York

Flashback to nearly ten years ago when Architectural Digest featured our New York home in the magazine. Photos taken by dear friend, Tim Street Porter. “I really hate fake everything,” says jewelry designer John Hardy, whose airy apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side is a kind of symphony of the real. Unexpected materials—from sconces of buffalo horn to Zulu hair hats—are used here to sumptuous effect. “We’re moving from luxury to authenticity as an idea,” Hardy says. “Authentic things seem to vibrate better.” Explore the whole gallery here or read the interview and story.

Cynthia Hardy

A profile of Cynthia Hardy

A wonderful interview and profile of Cynthia Hardy in MM. Lafleur. Cynthia talks about travels, her life as a mother, and her role as co-founder of Green School and more. ON FOUNDING A HOTEL… AND A SCHOOL: We started building our house in Bali in 1995, and it was finished in 1997. Then, in the early 2000s, a piece of land just south of ours came onto the market. We didn’t need more space, but we knew that if we didn’t buy it someone else was going to build a hotel there. So we bought it and sat on it for a few years. We knew this really industrious guy from Java, and we asked him to find us some furniture and old wooden houses—traditional ones built in primitive ways, from logs, without panels. We put them up on that land and had the Neiman Marcus buyers come out and stay there. Eventually, we decided to turn it into something that paid for itself, and now it’s a little hotel called Bambu Indah that’s essentially an …

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at Juliet’s blog or The Times. 

John Hardy the Green Warriort

The Green Warrior in Nuvo

A profile of John Hardy in Nuvo Magazine. In Canada, he says, “They’re living a completely unsustainable lifestyle … at the expense of their grandchildren. We’re creating green leaders. Every school [now] is studying green.” The difference at his school in the Balinese jungle, he explains, is that “kids are living green.” Read the whole article and interview with John on the Nuvo website.  He covers topics like education, design, conservation, Green School, IBUKU and more.      

John Hardy Bali home New York Times

NY Times: Building a dream house in Bali

A walk down memory lane to a 2008  New York Times article about our home in Bali. When it came to their house, “We talked to the architect, Cheong Yew Kuan, about a fantasy,” Cynthia Hardy explained. “John’s brief was as few walls as possible, floor-to-ceiling windows upstairs and no door downstairs to maximize the outdoor living experience and the fabulous view. We wanted the house to be as open and as transparent as possible, so you could see the rice fields from wherever you stood inside.” The couple fell in love with the site when they first spotted it in 1992 on a cycling trip around Ubud. At the time, they were living in a small house with no electricity or hot water on the very edge of the Ayung River gorge, below the luxury Amandari Resort.