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Everything related to Ibuku

Cacao House by IBUKU

Is Bamboo the Sustainable Building Material of the Future?

Vogue recently featured IBUKU’s work with an interview with Elora Hardy on her inspiration and design philosophy: “A lot of the problem is the curves, but that’s also the magic and the opportunity. Just as the best clothes wrap around real curves in just the right way, the way a house curves around you can feel just right,” Elora explains. “But it takes a different mind-set to get it right. Bamboo doesn’t follow the rules of the past few centuries of architecture and construction—it’s literally a different shape, being round and hollow and tapering. So as designers, we have to learn, then develop, then write the rules for ourselves, to suit what we see is possible with bamboo.” She likens her design approach to the way an artist works on a canvas. Rather than trying to create a specific vision on a blank page, she prefers to spill the ink and see how it flows.

Riverside Warung at Bambu Indah

Riverside Warung unveiled at Bambu Indah

We have something new at Bambu Indah. The Riverside Warung is now open, a joint design collaboration with IBUKU. Elora tells the story of how we came up with the design: “Years ago, the river warung & pools area were rice fields. When they were washed away by a break in the irrigation canal above, Dad recreated them into terraced ponds, and we walked past them for years on our way to the river, only occasionally dipping in. For a while we farmed shrimp there, at one point built a little guest house over the pond, and over the years a few magical parties. Then, it occurred to Dad that the spring water would be wonderful to swim in, and he had the ponds cleaned out and patched up a bit, and now they are pools. Because of the elevator, it’s suddenly a space that feels easy to get to, and once we started spending time down there we never wanted to leave.   He built some guest houses overlooking the pools, Copper and Moon, …

Sharma Springs entrance

READ: Elora Hardy’s treehouses from dreams

Green Village and IBUKU were recently featured on New Zealand’s Stuff website. Green Village panders to nature, not the other way around. Bamboo is more flexible, more durable and lighter than most timbers, and has greater ultimate strength than steel. It’s also termite resistant and, when treated with boron, makes it inedible for insects. Bamboo homes have been known to withstand 9.0 magnitude earthquakes. Take note, Wellington. Hardy’s father, jeweller John Hardy, founded the nearby Green School, another bamboo wonderland for children, dedicated to teaching sustainable living and holistic approaches to life. Both were created as places where people can live and learn in an authentic relationship with nature. Read the whole article by Rachel Thomas here.

Autodesk scan of a bamboo house by IBUKU

Autodesk’s Making the Future team came to Green Village

This is not an old Balinese painting, in fact it’s the latest in bamboo architecture, scanned by the incredible Autodesk team who came here to do the impossible- capture an artisan hand built house by IBUKU and turn it into a billion data points and dots using drones. Because Green Village’s homes are built from bamboo, they don’t have traditional walls, traditional squared corners, or uniform surfaces. The bamboo used to build the structures—which can be up to six stories high—is almost always curved (because bamboo often grows curved, and because the homes in Green Village are purposefully built with curves to best conform to their surroundings). The floors are made of sliced bamboo, creating deeply ridged textures. The interior walls are also made of bamboo, and from the outside, you can literally see clear through huge portions of each home to the forest on the other side. This makes the LiDAR capturing of Green Village’s structures very complex. Some of the light beams will hit curved outer bamboo walls and beams. Others will hit wildly textured furniture …

JOHN HARDY SPEAKS TO ARCH DAILY

ArchDaily talks to John Hardy

What has been developed in Bali goes far beyond just “innovative architecture” or “architecture in bamboo.” Instead, Hardy, his family, and his colleagues are attempting to bring about a new way of inhabiting this planet—a way that is truly sustainable, respectful of the environment and responsible with resources. Their technique can be used to build houses, schools, bridges and almost any other type of structure. And, if used according to the system that the Hardys have developed, these buildings can last several decades, contributing a solution to the growing problem of scarce resources and the unsustainable way in which we exploit them. The Hardys are also dedicated to teaching those who wish to learn about how to design and build sustainably. They have done so through initiatives such as their partnership with the AA in London, where they have conducted a series of popular workshops, or through permaculture courses taught in Kul-Kul farm, managed by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia. Arch Daily

Ananda House by Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest featuring Ananda House at Green Village

Hot off the press! IBUKU’s latest creation for David Hornblow and family at Green Village is in the May edition of Architectural Digest. “It’s really important to me that we move beyond the bamboo-hut idea,” explains Elora, the creative director, emphasizing Ibuku’s integration of technical innovation with local craftsmanship. The combination has resulted in properties that are surprisingly ambitious in scale—one of these surreal tropical mansions boasts six floors and measures more than 8,000 square feet. “As we continue to push the limits, my role is to be the connector,” says Elora, who grew up in Bali and has never studied architecture. “With the client and Ibuku’s architects, model makers, and craftsmen, there’s an entire dialogue that unfolds when we create these houses.” Read more here.

Bamboo U Workshop Bali February 2017 (4 of 13)

Building with bamboo: Photos from Bamboo U

The February edition of Bamboo U just wrapped up. The Kul Kul Farm team (led by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia) wrote a great review. There’s an excerpt of it below, but make sure to read the rest over on The Kul Kul Farm website.   Bamboo. The mighty plant of the tropics. The King (and Queen) of natural building. It stands tall in sheltered valleys, grows at a fascinating pace, and is gracefully flexible, strong and beautiful. Let’s face it, bamboo is why many people come to Green School. Combine this abundant material with the Balinese craftsmen and a creative design team.. and you have magic. And who doesn’t want magic? So here we are. Bamboo U: February Edition. Our second successful bamboo building course, envisioned by John Hardy, developed by us at the farm, with the support of Elora Hardy and the IBUKU team. Its a tall order delivering magic in 12 days, whilst giving people the skills and tools to create their own magic elsewhere. Especially when the experts; the Balinese craftsmen, don’t speak fluent English. But, when creative, …

Bamboo building course Bamboo U 2017

Join us for Bamboo U 2017

The Bamboo U camp held in 2016 was incredible. Take a look at the video below and then join us for the 2017 version.  Bamboo U is a design and bamboo building workshop in Bali hosted by the Kul Kul Farm at the Green School; facilitated in collaboration with the bamboo design firm, IBUKU. Bamboo U is an opportunity to design and build with bamboo alongside some of the architects, designers and craftsmen who built Green School. The group will investigate the available sites and hear from Elora Hardy and her team at IBUKU, the design firm that designed many of the classrooms at Green School and all the houses at Green Village.   

Falling for Balinese bamboo furniture

READ: IBUKU’s furniture collection in the Financial Times

“Fast forward to 2016 and back in Bali’s verdant hinterland, local artisans are carefully bending this ultra-sustainable resource into fantastically undulating sculptures, sans splinters, under the design direction of Hardy’s equally talented daughter Elora. The former designer at Donna Karan returned home to Bali in 2010 to realise what she calls her father’s “big dreams made out of overgrown grass”. This summer, Elora launched the Ibuku furniture collection, an online catalogue of these natural, artful furnishings that already populate the monumental custom bamboo houses of Green Village, this talented family’s other bamboo-building venture.” Read the full article by Cynthia Rosenfeld in the How to Spend It section of the Financial Times.

WIRED Best Designers 2016

READ: The best designers you need to be watching right now (WIRED)

Honored to be named in this WIRED Design Issue article on the best designers. Thanks to Bjarke Ingels for the amazing mention of IBUKU and Elora and John Hardy. For WIRED’s Design Issue, we celebrate the creatives – from architects to user experience masters, fashion designers to rocket scientists – shaping the world right now. As part of our cover profile on the architecture star Bjarke Ingels, we asked him to nominate the individuals in their respective fields he is most excited about right now. From fiction writers to builders of bamboo schools, here are five designers shaping the WIRED world right now. Entire article over on the WIRED site.