All posts filed under: John’s Green World

The Green Family in Bali and Press

Autodesk scan of a bamboo house by IBUKU

Autodesk’s Making the Future team came to Green Village

This is not an old Balinese painting, in fact it’s the latest in bamboo architecture, scanned by the incredible Autodesk team who came here to do the impossible- capture an artisan hand built house by IBUKU and turn it into a billion data points and dots using drones. Because Green Village’s homes are built from bamboo, they don’t have traditional walls, traditional squared corners, or uniform surfaces. The bamboo used to build the structures—which can be up to six stories high—is almost always curved (because bamboo often grows curved, and because the homes in Green Village are purposefully built with curves to best conform to their surroundings). The floors are made of sliced bamboo, creating deeply ridged textures. The interior walls are also made of bamboo, and from the outside, you can literally see clear through huge portions of each home to the forest on the other side. This makes the LiDAR capturing of Green Village’s structures very complex. Some of the light beams will hit curved outer bamboo walls and beams. Others will hit wildly textured furniture …

JOHN HARDY SPEAKS TO ARCH DAILY

ArchDaily talks to John Hardy

What has been developed in Bali goes far beyond just “innovative architecture” or “architecture in bamboo.” Instead, Hardy, his family, and his colleagues are attempting to bring about a new way of inhabiting this planet—a way that is truly sustainable, respectful of the environment and responsible with resources. Their technique can be used to build houses, schools, bridges and almost any other type of structure. And, if used according to the system that the Hardys have developed, these buildings can last several decades, contributing a solution to the growing problem of scarce resources and the unsustainable way in which we exploit them. The Hardys are also dedicated to teaching those who wish to learn about how to design and build sustainably. They have done so through initiatives such as their partnership with the AA in London, where they have conducted a series of popular workshops, or through permaculture courses taught in Kul-Kul farm, managed by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia. Arch Daily

Glamping in Bali

Igloos in Bali?

Winter has arrived in Bali…. The new tents at Bambu Indah– a new take on glamping in Bali. More about Bambu Indah:  Bambu Indah combines the use of restored antique houses with much newer structures built with sustainable bamboo. Instead of using concrete foundations, stilted buildings can ultimately be moved or removed with little impact to the ground. The designs also promote use of natural light, ventilation and passive cooling with the use of open air spaces, pitched ceilings, and stilted buildings. Traditional thatching requires the careful maintenance of local craftsmen. Bambu Indah uses lava stones and a vegetation regeneration zone, which operates to naturally cleanse, filter and oxygenate the water and nurture beneficial bacteria in the pool. A water flow system and high-density polyethylene liner, which can be recycled after 60 years of life, creates a natural pool that does not use chlorine, algaecides or cement.

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at The Times.

Jaggery by Suzi Mifsud

Permaculture solutions for Bali’s coconut problems

A permaculture story by Orin Hardy.  There are lot of coconut trees in Bali and they’re a very important part of Bali’s culture and life. Coconuts are an incredible food source and they are disappearing because people don’t know how to climb trees any more, or how to manage the trees in increasingly populated areas where the coconuts actually become dangerous to people walking around underneath them. At Green School, The Kul Kul Farm has been working to find ways to ensure the long term productivity and ongoing management of the existing trees on the campus. Before the school existed the land was used as a coconut plantation, so now we look for ways to keep the trees productive and the school safe. It’s actually even more productive than it used to be as a coconut plantation because we are increasing the yields and we’re producing added value products like coconut sugar. The high quality sugar we produce is also supporting the development of a small industry in the area. The coconut climbing tool in …

John Hardy the Green Warriort

The Green Warrior in Nuvo

A profile of John Hardy in Nuvo Magazine. In Canada, he says, “They’re living a completely unsustainable lifestyle … at the expense of their grandchildren. We’re creating green leaders. Every school [now] is studying green.” The difference at his school in the Balinese jungle, he explains, is that “kids are living green.” Read the whole article and interview with John on the Nuvo website.  He covers topics like education, design, conservation, Green School, IBUKU and more.      

Sumba Hospirality Foundation permaculture gardens

The permaculture gardens of the Sumba Hospitality campus

Orin has been working on the gardens at the Sumba Hospitality Foundation as long as the IBUKU team were planning the beautiful buildings. They have really become something special. The Sumba Hotel School is setting a new tone for development on an island that is rapidly becoming another tourism destination in Indonesia. Built entirely of bamboo, this school offers high quality hospitality training to underprivileged young men and women on the island. The campus is off the grid and powered by solar power. Water is recycled and reused to water the gardens. The landscape is designed following permaculture ethics and principles. It includes a extensive food forests, an annual market garden, rotating animal system,  a collection of edible street trees, medicinal plants, and other perennials used for food and animal fodder. Students learn not only how to work in hospitality industry,  but are also taught how to care for the land and how to grow food and raise animals sustainably. It is a beautiful illustration of how to help traditional peoples enter the modern world …

John hardy in The Hindu

The Hindu: How green is your school?

A feature in The Hindu on Green School and John Hardy. With larger-than-life bamboo structures, the campus is supported by solar and hydro-power, a water recycling unit and a waste management centre. Leslie Beckman, a school administrator, who has three kids studying here, says, “The Kul Kul Connection programme, which is our integration with the Balinese community, allows the culture to happen naturally from within, rather than expats going to ‘view’ a local experience.” Bandana Tewari, a senior fashion journalist whose child studies here, says, “My daughter came to the Green School for a summer camp and that led the way for us to move here. Issues she was facing, such as low attention span, disinterest towards studying, have now vanished. She’s now a part of the Bio Bus project, where a bunch of children pick up over-used oil from restaurants across the city. The by-product, bio-diesel, is to run the school buses.” Read the whole article How green is your school? over at The Hindu’s website.

Join the Crowdrise campaign to get more students into Green School!

  Help make the stream of generosity become a river of love. There’s a lot of people pushing, so please join in giving us a push. John Hardy   Every single donation will be used to support local children and waste-related educational and learning activities. We happily share all our creative sustainable solutions with the 100,000+ people who connect with Green School each year. With your donation we will: Build a Community and Waste Recycling Education Centre (Innovation Hub) – over 700 children will be able to incubate, investigate, implement and share even better waste management solutions. $100,000 of campaign money will allow us to build this and fling the doors open to students and their ideas. Expand waste management solutions – let’s turn even more trash into desirable treasures by expanding the current reuse-recycle program. Turning plastic waste into usable products and art, up-cycling fashion design using repurposed/used clothing, maker-space equipment to repair household items, plus more, can all happen with $50,000 of campaign money to kit-out the innovation lab with the right equipment. …

Maxwell Hidajat at TEDxUbud

Green School Student Admitted to the Ivy League

We have our first Green School graduate heading to the Ivy League. Huge news and huge congratulations to Maxwell Hidajat for his achievement. Green School is more than competing at an international level academically in addition to everything else these amazing students are achieving holistically. A message from Maxwell Hidajat : “I will be joining Cornell’s community this August as a member of the Class of 2021 and as a student at Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences. Although I plan to study computer science there, I’m open to the possibility that I will find something else I’m passionate about and decide to pursue that instead. After all, Cornell is known for offering its students a rich and diverse array of academic pathways and extracurricular opportunities. Although I’m sad to be leaving Green School, I am extremely excited to make new friends, gain new experiences, and learn new things at Cornell and beyond. To my friends, my teachers, the kitchen staff, the gardeners, the security guards, the parents, and everyone else at Green School: thank …