Month: September 2017

Autodesk scan of a bamboo house by IBUKU

Autodesk’s Making the Future team came to Green Village

This is not an old Balinese painting, in fact it’s the latest in bamboo architecture, scanned by the incredible Autodesk team who came here to do the impossible- capture an artisan hand built house by IBUKU and turn it into a billion data points and dots using drones. Because Green Village’s homes are built from bamboo, they don’t have traditional walls, traditional squared corners, or uniform surfaces. The bamboo used to build the structures—which can be up to six stories high—is almost always curved (because bamboo often grows curved, and because the homes in Green Village are purposefully built with curves to best conform to their surroundings). The floors are made of sliced bamboo, creating deeply ridged textures. The interior walls are also made of bamboo, and from the outside, you can literally see clear through huge portions of each home to the forest on the other side. This makes the LiDAR capturing of Green Village’s structures very complex. Some of the light beams will hit curved outer bamboo walls and beams. Others will hit wildly textured furniture …

JOHN HARDY SPEAKS TO ARCH DAILY

ArchDaily talks to John Hardy

What has been developed in Bali goes far beyond just “innovative architecture” or “architecture in bamboo.” Instead, Hardy, his family, and his colleagues are attempting to bring about a new way of inhabiting this planet—a way that is truly sustainable, respectful of the environment and responsible with resources. Their technique can be used to build houses, schools, bridges and almost any other type of structure. And, if used according to the system that the Hardys have developed, these buildings can last several decades, contributing a solution to the growing problem of scarce resources and the unsustainable way in which we exploit them. The Hardys are also dedicated to teaching those who wish to learn about how to design and build sustainably. They have done so through initiatives such as their partnership with the AA in London, where they have conducted a series of popular workshops, or through permaculture courses taught in Kul-Kul farm, managed by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia. Arch Daily

Glamping in Bali

Igloos in Bali?

Winter has arrived in Bali…. The new tents at Bambu Indah– a new take on glamping in Bali. More about Bambu Indah:  Bambu Indah combines the use of restored antique houses with much newer structures built with sustainable bamboo. Instead of using concrete foundations, stilted buildings can ultimately be moved or removed with little impact to the ground. The designs also promote use of natural light, ventilation and passive cooling with the use of open air spaces, pitched ceilings, and stilted buildings. Traditional thatching requires the careful maintenance of local craftsmen. Bambu Indah uses lava stones and a vegetation regeneration zone, which operates to naturally cleanse, filter and oxygenate the water and nurture beneficial bacteria in the pool. A water flow system and high-density polyethylene liner, which can be recycled after 60 years of life, creates a natural pool that does not use chlorine, algaecides or cement.

Turkmenistan Exploring

A gas rich, ex Soviet mirage in the desert. Somewhere between Las Vegas and Dubai without any sin. Definitely the strangest place I’ve ever visited in my life. Highly recommend it because it’s there. This is the city. No cars on the street. No traffic. Like nothing you’ve ever seen. The video on the plane says it all. A post shared by John Hardy (@greenbyjohn) on Aug 29, 2017 at 11:20pm PDT Friday at the mosque. No one else there, just our guide and one guy watching us at all times. A mind bogglingly huge mosque. The wedding’s over, you put the scarf in your mouth and you say nothing until the kids are born. You have no voice. For more on this astounding Turkmenistan tradition, read on. Some women carry on the practice of wearing a yaşmak, head scarf, in the initial year after they are wed. The wife clenches the corner of her scarf in her teeth to show a significant barrier toward the male guests and to show respect to her parents-in-law. The …