Year: 2017

Autodesk scan of a bamboo house by IBUKU

Autodesk’s Making the Future team came to Green Village

This is not an old Balinese painting, in fact it’s the latest in bamboo architecture, scanned by the incredible Autodesk team who came here to do the impossible- capture an artisan hand built house by IBUKU and turn it into a billion data points and dots using drones. Because Green Village’s homes are built from bamboo, they don’t have traditional walls, traditional squared corners, or uniform surfaces. The bamboo used to build the structures—which can be up to six stories high—is almost always curved (because bamboo often grows curved, and because the homes in Green Village are purposefully built with curves to best conform to their surroundings). The floors are made of sliced bamboo, creating deeply ridged textures. The interior walls are also made of bamboo, and from the outside, you can literally see clear through huge portions of each home to the forest on the other side. This makes the LiDAR capturing of Green Village’s structures very complex. Some of the light beams will hit curved outer bamboo walls and beams. Others will hit wildly textured furniture …

JOHN HARDY SPEAKS TO ARCH DAILY

ArchDaily talks to John Hardy

What has been developed in Bali goes far beyond just “innovative architecture” or “architecture in bamboo.” Instead, Hardy, his family, and his colleagues are attempting to bring about a new way of inhabiting this planet—a way that is truly sustainable, respectful of the environment and responsible with resources. Their technique can be used to build houses, schools, bridges and almost any other type of structure. And, if used according to the system that the Hardys have developed, these buildings can last several decades, contributing a solution to the growing problem of scarce resources and the unsustainable way in which we exploit them. The Hardys are also dedicated to teaching those who wish to learn about how to design and build sustainably. They have done so through initiatives such as their partnership with the AA in London, where they have conducted a series of popular workshops, or through permaculture courses taught in Kul-Kul farm, managed by Orin Hardy and Maria Farrugia. Arch Daily

Glamping in Bali

Igloos in Bali?

Winter has arrived in Bali…. The new tents at Bambu Indah– a new take on glamping in Bali. More about Bambu Indah:  Bambu Indah combines the use of restored antique houses with much newer structures built with sustainable bamboo. Instead of using concrete foundations, stilted buildings can ultimately be moved or removed with little impact to the ground. The designs also promote use of natural light, ventilation and passive cooling with the use of open air spaces, pitched ceilings, and stilted buildings. Traditional thatching requires the careful maintenance of local craftsmen. Bambu Indah uses lava stones and a vegetation regeneration zone, which operates to naturally cleanse, filter and oxygenate the water and nurture beneficial bacteria in the pool. A water flow system and high-density polyethylene liner, which can be recycled after 60 years of life, creates a natural pool that does not use chlorine, algaecides or cement.

Turkmenistan Exploring

A gas rich, ex Soviet mirage in the desert. Somewhere between Las Vegas and Dubai without any sin. Definitely the strangest place I’ve ever visited in my life. Highly recommend it because it’s there. This is the city. No cars on the street. No traffic. Like nothing you’ve ever seen. The video on the plane says it all. A post shared by John Hardy (@greenbyjohn) on Aug 29, 2017 at 11:20pm PDT Friday at the mosque. No one else there, just our guide and one guy watching us at all times. A mind bogglingly huge mosque. The wedding’s over, you put the scarf in your mouth and you say nothing until the kids are born. You have no voice. For more on this astounding Turkmenistan tradition, read on. Some women carry on the practice of wearing a yaşmak, head scarf, in the initial year after they are wed. The wife clenches the corner of her scarf in her teeth to show a significant barrier toward the male guests and to show respect to her parents-in-law. The …

Chiara Hardy in Milk

Matriarchy Now in Milk Magazine

Chiara Hardy discusses all things Matriarchy Now in an interview in Milk magazine. Firstly, as the creator of the brand, how would you define “Matriarchy Now,” and why do you feel it’s so important? It means something different for everyone, but to me, it embodies a vision for the future, a demand for disruption and a declaration of power. Matriarchy Now is about changing/disrupting the predominantly hierarchical and patriarchal systems that we live in, and yes, I am wholly aware of the broadness of this claim. In its entirety, the demand for a matriarchy is a demand for the end of systemic violence of all kinds that are upheld by patriarchy. The literal definition of Matriarchy is part of the meaning that Matriarchy Now takes on, but Matriarchy Now aims to repurpose that definition into something greater. It’s a vision for a future in which women in positions of power uplift and change our society, because “a rising tide lifts all boats.” I think something people don’t get is the very simple thing that women’s …

Plastic upcycling

WATCH: The Plastic Economy

2013 TED speaker Miranda Wang founded BioCellection—a technology to enable circularity for the plastic economy. Plastic is a problem but it can also be part of the solution. The technology that Miranda Wang is developing can convert plastic polymers into value added chemicals. The technology being developed by BioCellection will convert plastic polymers into value-added chemicals that have applications in myriad fields such as in the manufacture of paints, plasticizers, textiles, polyurethanes, detergents, cleaners, etc. Our process involves two steps: 1) a hydrolysis process that converts paper and organic waste, often present in the waste plastic stream, into sugars and alcohols, and 2) an oxidation process that converts waste plastic polymers into organic acids. The second step of the process involves breaking the polymer chains into smaller pieces and adding oxygen to these chains to form different acids. The conditions used are considerably milder than pyrolysis processes.

Copper artisan of Mexico

The copper artisans of Mexico

Recently had a chance to hang out in the coppersmith workshops of Santa Clara del Cobre in the mountains of Mexico. Copper has been worked in this area since pre-Hispanic times. Although the Spanish introduced new techniques, one native one that was kept was that of smelting, as it was more efficient than European techniques. For this reason, bellows seen here are very different from Europe. Most of the town’s population, 82%, is employed in the making of copper items. There are 250 registered workshops in and around the town, which process about 450 tons of copper each year. This generates an income of about fifty million pesos a year. Many of the copper items made are of a utilitarian nature – cooking utensils, various types of containers, pots, pans, plates, shot glasses, clocks, jewelry, vases, beds, tables, chairs, light switches, counters, sinks, even bathtubs, and much, much more, all in copper. However, since the 1970s copper jewelry, and many other non-essential items has also been made here. –  Wikipedia   Cynthia giving a hand A post …

Hardy Architectural Digest Photos by Tim Street Porter

Architectural Digest: The Hardy home in New York

Flashback to nearly ten years ago when Architectural Digest featured our New York home in the magazine. Photos taken by dear friend, Tim Street Porter. “I really hate fake everything,” says jewelry designer John Hardy, whose airy apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side is a kind of symphony of the real. Unexpected materials—from sconces of buffalo horn to Zulu hair hats—are used here to sumptuous effect. “We’re moving from luxury to authenticity as an idea,” Hardy says. “Authentic things seem to vibrate better.” Explore the whole gallery here or read the interview and story.

Cynthia Hardy

A profile of Cynthia Hardy

A wonderful interview and profile of Cynthia Hardy in MM. Lafleur. Cynthia talks about travels, her life as a mother, and her role as co-founder of Green School and more. ON FOUNDING A HOTEL… AND A SCHOOL: We started building our house in Bali in 1995, and it was finished in 1997. Then, in the early 2000s, a piece of land just south of ours came onto the market. We didn’t need more space, but we knew that if we didn’t buy it someone else was going to build a hotel there. So we bought it and sat on it for a few years. We knew this really industrious guy from Java, and we asked him to find us some furniture and old wooden houses—traditional ones built in primitive ways, from logs, without panels. We put them up on that land and had the Neiman Marcus buyers come out and stay there. Eventually, we decided to turn it into something that paid for itself, and now it’s a little hotel called Bambu Indah that’s essentially an …

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at The Times.